So you want to organise an event?

Here is a checklist for event organisers to consider:

1) Date

One of the challenges for any event organiser is knowing what date to pick.

We can't do anything about the weather but what we can do is show you when other people have historically organised their events around the globe. Using data from www.kitecalendar.co.uk, this spreadsheet allows you to check your chosen dates so that you can see whether other events have traditionally used that date. You can check by date-to-date, you can look at week numbers or you can look at week number in a given month ("first weekend in November").

Click here

IMPORTANT:  This is historic data.  We know www.kitecalendar.co.uk make every effort to verify their data but neither www.kitecalendar.co.uk nor BKFA can accept any responsibility for any problems arising out of the use of this data - it can only be a guide. It must not be assumed to show the dates for any events in the future.  Please check www.kitecalendar.co.uk for future events.

2) Type of event

Decide what sort of event it is going to be. Big display and spectator sport or local fun and participant sport? Dropping teddy bears (always popular)? Kite making for kids? Other sorts of children's stall (e.g. face painting)? On site food and drink? Is there going to be a full time commentator?

3) Inform CAA

The CAA must be informed at least one month before the proposed date. The form you use can be found here. You must also inform the local police at the same time as CAA.

4) Temporary events notice

If the event is to involve the sale of alcohol or live music, you must obtain a Temporary Events Notice from your local council a few weeks in advance. There is a fee for this service.

5) Insurance

Invited kite fliers will have their own insurance, possibly through their local club. Other fliers should have their own personal liability insurance. If an incident which might lead to an insurance claim happens, please let us know on our incident report form.

6) Risk Assessment

You should carry out a risk assessment. We have a comprehensive one here. If something bad happens and someone claims against you, having done a risk assessment will undoubtedly help your defence. More importantly, it will help prevent the incident from occurring in the first place.

7) Arena

The flying arena will need to be staked out. Metal road pins can be a hazard to large kites, which can sometimes pull then out of the ground if the line gets wrapped round a pin (this has happened). Traffic cones or plastic cones are less dangerous.

8) First aid

Kite flying is not normally a high risk activity but small accidents have happened before at kite festivals. A first aid box will not come amiss, though the only injury I know of happening is rope burn which was softened with elastoplast. Have a mobile phone if reception is available in case someone has a heart attack from over excitement or exertion.

9) PA system

Make sure it works and you know how to work it before you start the show. Obvious, but in my experience not obvious to everybody.

10) Overight kite store

If it is a two day event kite fliers may well want to store their kites overnight somewhere.

11) Traffic control and signage

The smallest traffic sign that can easily be seen from a car is A3. A4 is too small to be easily seen.

12) Miscellaneous

Other things to consider are rubbish (wheelie bins delivery, use and collection) and clearing up afterwards, toilets, availability of water, publicity, camping and accommodation, car parking, sustenance for invited kite fliers.

As with most things, the best way of running a successful festival is attention to detail.